Patients with multiple myeloma may not be receiving optimal therapeutic management for bone disease, according to a study published in Supportive Care in Cancer.

Current treatment recommendations suggest initiating intravenous bisphosphonates (eg, zoledronic acid, clodronate, pamidronate) for patients with multiple myeloma, not only for bone disease but also, as previous studies have demonstrated, possible benefit to overall survival and progression-free survival. The direction of treatment upon response to primary myeloma therapy and real-world use in this patient population, however, requires further investigation.

For this retrospective study, researchers collected data from 11,112 patients with multiple myeloma and evaluated the timing, frequency, schedule, change in dosing schedule, and discontinuation of zoledronic acid or pamidronate. Secondary outcomes included identifying predictors of bisphosphonate treatment initiation and to further analyze data once patients were stratified by chronic kidney disease stage.

After a median follow-up of 687 days, results showed that 63% of patients received at least 1 dose of bisphosphonate therapy; patients received first dose of bisphosphonates after a mean time of 106 days after multiple myeloma diagnosis.

Therapy was initiated within the first year of diagnosis in approximately 58% of patients, but slightly more than 50% had a change in dosing or discontinued treatment.

Patients who had poor renal function as measured by eGFR were less likely to receive bisphosphonate therapy and experienced a greater delay in therapy initiation. Therapy was initiated in 72% of patients at eGFR stage 1 vs 24% at eGFR stage 5, and treatment was initiated 25 days after diagnosis vs 70 days after diagnosis, respectively.

Reference

Kim C, Hernandez RK, Cyprien L, Liede A, Cheng PC. Patterns of bisphosphonate treatment among patients with multiple myeloma treated at oncology clinics across the USA: observations from real-world data [published online March 7, 2018]. Support Care Cancer.  doi: 10.1007/s00520-018-4133-1

Patientswith multiple myeloma may not be receiving optimal therapeutic management forbone disease, according to a study published in Supportive Care in Cancer.

 

Currenttreatment recommendations suggest initiating intravenous bisphosphonates (eg,zoledronic acid, clodronate, pamidronate) for patients with multiple myeloma, notonly for bone disease but also, as previous studies have demonstrated, possiblebenefit to overall survival and progression-free survival. The direction oftreatment upon response to primary myeloma therapy and real-world use in thispatient population, however, requires further investigation.

 

For thisretrospective study, researchers collected data from 11,112 patients withmultiple myeloma and evaluated the timing, frequency, schedule, change indosing schedule, and discontinuation of zoledronic acid or pamidronate.Secondary outcomes included identifying predictors of bisphosphonate treatmentinitiation and to further analyze data once patients were stratified by chronickidney disease stage.

 

After amedian follow-up of 687 days, results showed that 63% of patients received atleast 1 dose of bisphosphonate therapy; patients received first dose of bisphosphonatesafter a mean time of 106 days after multiple myeloma diagnosis.

 

Therapywas initiated within the first year of diagnosis in approximately 58% ofpatients, but slightly more than 50% had a change in dosing or discontinuedtreatment.

 

Patientswho had poor renal function as measured by eGFR were less likely to receive bisphosphonatetherapy and experienced a greater delay in therapy initiation. Therapy wasinitiated in 72% of patients at eGFR stage 1 vs 24% at eGFR stage 5, and treatmentwas initiated 25 days after diagnosis vs 70 days after diagnosis, respectively.

 

Reference

Kim C,Hernandez RK, Cyprien L, Liede A, Cheng PC. Patterns of bisphosphonatetreatment among patients with multiple myeloma treated at oncology clinicsacross the USA: observations from real-world data [published online March 7,2018]. Support Care Cancer.  doi: 10.1007/s00520-018-4133-

This article originally appeared on ONA